Why organic compounds show polarity?

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Bond polarity is due to differences in electronegativity (EN), the intrinsic ability of an atom to attract the shared electrons in a covalent bond. Electronegativities are based on an arbitrary scale, with fluorine being the most electronegative (EN  4.0) and cesium, the least (EN  0.7). Metals on the left side of the periodic table attract electrons weakly and have lower electronegativities, whereas the halogens and other reactive nonmetals on the right side of the periodic table attract electrons strongly and have higher electronegativities. Carbon, the most important element in organic compounds,  has an electronegativity value of 2.5.

In briefly , bonds between atoms whose electronegativities differ by less than 0.5 are nonpolar covalent, bonds between atoms whose electronegativities differ by 0.5 to 2 are polar covalent, and bonds between atoms whose electronegativities differ by more than 2 are largely ionic.

Carbon–hydrogen bonds, for example, are relatively nonpolar because carbon (EN = 2.5) and hydrogen (EN = 2.1) have similar electronegativities.

Bonds between carbon and more electronegative elements such as oxygen (EN = 3.5) and nitrogen (EN = 3.0), by contrast, are polarized so that the bonding electrons are drawn away from carbon toward the electronegative atom. This leaves carbon with a partial positive charge, denoted by δ+, and the electronegative atom with a partial negative charge, δ. An example is the C=O bond in methanol, CH3OH . Bonds between carbon and less

electronegative elements are polarized so that carbon bears a partial negative charge and the other atom bears a partial positive charge. An example is methyllithium, CH3Li.

Souece: Organic Chemistry, John Mcmurry, 7th edition

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